April 2019

Three-quarters of U.S. employers said they have been directly affected by employee opioid use, but only 17% said they feel “extremely well prepared” to deal with it, according to a new study from the National Safety Council (NSC).

More than a third (38%) said they have experienced absenteeism or impaired worker performance because of opioid use and 31% reported an overdose, arrest or an injury because of opioid use.

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March 2019

Employers have been unknowingly contributing to the nation’s opioid crisis by paying too much for poor benefits. Now is the time to act, writes Dave Chase is co-founder of Health Rosetta.

With the opioid crisis dominating today’s news cycle, it’s easy for employers to believe it’s an issue far bigger than themselves. But the reality is it isn’t.

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What’s the potential for retail clinic utilization? That depends on the pace of the cultural shift taking place in health care.

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You’ve probably heard the mind-blowing statistics: Every 13 minutes, someone in the U.S. dies of an opioid overdose. The total reached a record 72,000 deaths in 2017, the CDC reports, making prescription pain medications like Oxycontin, Vicodin, and the synthetic opioid fentanyl even bigger killers than diseases like diabetes. Addiction to pain pills is so widespread, across every U.S. age, race, and income group, that it’s nearly impossible to say how many Americans are quietly struggling with it.

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Last month, one furloughed government worker made national headlines by saying she had to ration her insulin because she couldn’t afford her co-pay, nor the ER bill, during the government shutdown. Recalling a day where her blood sugar was high, she admitted, “I just went to bed and hoped I’d wake up.”

This is not how health care should work. And yet, Mallory Lorge is not the only American to have faced such a decision.

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Blame runs far and wide for America’s addiction crisis, but where does individual responsibility factor in? The question (and answer) has been largely absent in the compassion-driven campaign to save lives from opioids in the past several years.

As overdose deaths skyrocket, largely due to excessive demand for the deadly, hyper-infused opioid Fentanyl, Americans have become desperate.

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At some point in their lives, 80 percent of adults will experience lower back pain. It’s the second most common reason that adults see a doctor and the most common reason for disability. It’s also a microcosm of all the things that are wrong with the U.S. health care system, including its contribution to the opioid crisis.

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At some point in their lives, 80 percent of adults will experience lower back pain. It’s the second most common reason that adults see a doctor and the most common reason for disability. It’s also a microcosm of all the things that are wrong with the U.S. health care system, including its contribution to the opioid crisis.

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Employers, from whom more than half of Washingtonians get their health insurance, are also struggling to keep up with escalating costs — and not just in the private sector. Even municipalities feel the pressure, and many have been forced to make difficult decisions that negatively impact their employees, such as raising deductibles to offset costs.

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February 2019

In response to today’s opioid crisis, the Food and Drug Administration is pushing for naloxone, an overdose-reversing nasal spray, to become available to patients over the counter.

With more than 130 Americans dying each day from an opioid-related drug overdose, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services, making naloxone readily available is one way to prevent death.

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In a tightening labor market, employees expect (and receive) higher salaries and better benefits. Businesses must find innovative ways to stay competitive and attract top talent. This can be especially difficult for small business with limited financial resources. With a record number of Americans quitting their jobs — up to 3.3 million in 2018 — now is the time to act.

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We hear much grunting and groaning about millennials – their addiction to cell phones, social media and the tendency to hop from one job to the next – but the one thing they do very well is disrupt the status quo health care system by refusing to settle for slow, low-quality care that costs more every year.

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The pitches to the health insurance brokers are tantalizing.

“Set sail for Bermuda,” says insurance giant Cigna, offering top-selling brokers five days at one of the island’s luxury resorts.

Health Net of California’s pitch is not subtle: A smiling woman in a business suit rides a giant $100 bill like it’s a surfboard. “Sell more, enroll more, get paid more!” In some cases, its ad says, a broker can “power up” the bonus to $150,000 per employer group.

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The insurance industry gives lucrative commissions and bonuses — from six-figure payouts to a chance to bat against Mariano Rivera — to the independent brokers who advise employers. Critics call the payments a “classic conflict of interest” that drive up costs.

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January 2019

People are standing by today’s disastrous status quo healthcare system, and quite frankly, it’s nonsensical.

Rather than defending something that is clearly broken out of fear that change will make things worse—though it’s hard to imagine how—it’s time to stop seeking security in tradition and enact change.

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Since 2013, 66 percent of employers have increased their health and wellness program offerings — on-site fitness centers, yoga classes, massages — and 67 percent plan to offer even more over the next five years.

These wellness programs and initiatives have picked up speed and popularity, becoming the trendy “one-stop solution” that employers can implement to check “employee health” off their to-do lists. Unfortunately, there is little research to support the efficacy of these programs.

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As was the case for most of the last couple decades, the cost of health care continued to climb in 2018. This past year, the average employer-sponsored family plan, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation, approached $20,000, and there’s yet another five percent increase expected for 2019.

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The opioid crisis in the U.S. continues to gain attention, but it’s not going away. For recruiters and employers, acknowledging how the crisis is affecting, or will soon affect, their workplaces will be crucial. According to a survey by The Hartford, 67 percent of companies either have been or will be affected by opioid use.

That impact is largely monetary; in fact, the survey found that 65 percent of HR professionals said they’ve seen opioids have financial consequences on their company due to increased health care spending and employee productivity losses.

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The recent growing number of opioid abuse in the workplace has raised alarm over claims of intervention by employers through Employee Assistance Programs(EAPs). Lack of substantial evidence has forced many into arguing that employers are rather using EAPs to justify other causes and not as supportive as claimed.

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With 29 percent of workers planning to leave their jobs in 2019, according to a survey from the American Institute of CPAs (AICPA), employers need to understand how to get employees to stay.

One key to retention: benefits.

The AICPA survey found that 80 percent of people would choose a job with better benefits over a job with better pay but no benefits.

In the midst of a tightening talent market, here are three reasons why companies must improve their benefits packages today:

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When Joey Huang, co-owner of Great Lakes Auto Network in Ohio, looked at the cost of providing health care insurance to his almost 300 employees, he figured there must be a cheaper alternative.

What he found — self-funded insurance — has cut employees’ premiums by thousands of dollars a year, saved the group more than $1.8 million over six years and helped Great Lakes expand from three dealerships to six, doubling its work force along the way.

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  • Walmart and CVS Caremark are splitting over a price dispute, CVS announced Tuesday.
  • CVS Caremark is CVS Health’s pharmacy benefit management (PBM) division.
  • The news means that many people who have CVS Health drug plans will no longer be able to pick up their prescriptions at Walmart locations.

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People who don’t understand how their health insurance works are more likely to avoid care. Low health insurance literacy can lead to people skipping basic care, like cancer screenings, according to a new study.

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We all know there is strength in numbers, but when it comes to purchasing health services, how do numbers translate into buying power? More specifically, health care buying power? Can any organization become part of a purchasing consortium, or are effective health coalitions limited to major employers that can bring thousands of plan members as a bargaining chip to the benefits table?

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The days of long waits at the doctor’s office have been replaced by a completely opposite, but perhaps even more troubling problem.

A ‘revolving door’ mentality has led patients to feel as though their problems aren’t being properly addressed by their primary care provider. Combined with costs, it’s one explanation for recent data from the Health Care Cost Institute that states office visits to primary care providers dropped 18 percent between 2012 and 2016, while visits to NPs and PAs jumped 129 percent in that same time frame.

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A new survey by The Hartford found 65 percent of HR professionals recognize the opioid crisis is affecting their business, but the majority have not been trained on how to deal with addiction in the workplace.

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A health care expert predicts 2019 will be marked by a backlash against high deductibles as consumers fear accessing health care because of rising out-of-pocket costs.

Dave Chase is co-founder of Health Rosetta, which certifies benefits advisors to help their employer clients save money on employee benefits by improving the plans they offer their workers. He also is author of The CEO’s Guide To Restoring The American Dream.

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Dr. Jeanette welcomes Dave Chase, co-founder of The Health Rosetta and author of The Opioid Crisis Wake-up Call; Health Care is Stealing the American Dream. Here’s How We Take it Back, to discuss the chaos that is now occurring in the healthcare system.

“It is the time of implosion of healthcare” Dr. Jeanette

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The opioid crisis in America is considered by many to be the worst national public health crisis in the last 100 years. In his new book, The Opioid Crisis Wake Up Call: Health Care is Stealing the American Dream. Here is How We Take It Back (Health Rosetta Media, 2018), Dave Chase dives into the history and causes of the crisis and outlines a path towards fixing it. Dave takes a thoughtful look at our dysfunctional healthcare system and sees ways it can be fixed using technologies and strategies that are already in use at some organizations. He talks about ways to eliminate waste and corruption while restoring hope to the American public.

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Today’s opioid crisis is one of the most dire side effects driven by our dysfunctional U.S. healthcare system. A recent JAMA Surgery report found that many surgeons prescribe four times more opioids than their patients use. This opens the door for misuse and abuse later on. In fact, the total combined cost of misuse, abuse, dependence and overdose is about $78.5 billion.

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Medical tourism, or medical travel, historically appealed to either wealthy travelers or those unable to access experimental treatment in the U.S. Now, more brokers with self-funded clients are exploring medical travel as a benefits package option. It isn’t for everyone, but in the instances where it does fit, employers and employees can both realize consideration savings without settling for lower quality care.

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December 2018

When companies try to tackle rising healthcare costs, shifting more of the burden to employees is increasingly the strategy of choice.But Activision Blizzard, an entertainment company that employs more than 6,000 people in the United States, has been spending less on healthcare than projected for the last few years, in large part because it is offering better options for cancer care.Read the rest of the article here

December is a month for celebration, reflection and expectation. We decided to leave the first two to others and focus on the year to come in five categories: technology, plan design, management, cost control and broker business.

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Page 16 quick link

In this episode we’re rejoined by another veteran of the program. He’s here for an encore appearance to tell us all about a new book that he’s released. He is the one and only, Dave Chase. Dave was the CEO and Co-founder of Avado, which was acquired by & integrated into WebMD & Medscape.

Listen to the Interview here

Joe Madison the Black Eagle

Dave Chase, author of “The Opioid Crisis Wake-Up Call,” joined Joe Madison to explain how the crisis is affecting the lives of Americans all over the country, and what can be done about it.

Listen to the Interview here

2018 was an undeniable year for millennial interest in finance, financial planning, saving and budgeting. In fact in The Pinterest 100, Pinterest’s annual December list of the 100 trends for the coming year, they reported these search terms would continue to be of interest in 2019. They added to the list weekly savings planners, as they are “helping people cut corners, pay off debt and even save up for something nice,” and searches for “52-week savings plan” were up +295%.Read the rest of the article here
With a tightening labor force and the unemployment rate at a mere 3.7%, employers are chasing the talent—not the other way around. Not only that, but it’s getting more difficult to keep the most capable workers around. Since 2015, there have been more job openings than new hires, which means unhappy employees have more opportunities to find a new position.Read the rest of the article here

Fidel Castro is dead. Donald Trump was elected president. And to most outsiders, the fate of Cuba has never seemed more uncertain. Yet those who look close enough may recognize that signs of the next revolution are etched in plain view.

This is Cuba is a true story that begins in the summer of 2009 when a young American photo-journalist is offered the chance of a lifetime―a two-year assignment in Havana. For David Ariosto, the island is an intriguing new world, unmoored from the one he left behind.

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November 2018

Healthcare is incredibly complicated. And it’s weird, because I almost take comfort in the confusion. If my doctor says things I don’t understand, part of me thinks, “Alright, well, they should be smarter than me. The fact that I’m confused is probably a good thing.”

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They call themselves consultants rather than brokers. They intend to make their money ultimately by delivering measurable value to clients, rather than taking fees for services that may or may not be in the client’s best interests.

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Self-Insuring Public Employers Provide a Roadmap for Changing the Course of Health Care

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We’ve scouted the web for healthcare influencers with a robust social media presence and put together the list below of the top Healthcare Influencers of 2018.

Our goal for this list is to present helpful tips right from the healthcare experts themselves. We found that the influencers listed have outstanding credentials, expertise, and skills pertaining to the healthcare industry, as well as an impressive quantity of social media followers.

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Listeners may recall, I have previously discussed the opioid epidemic this past February 2 with Dr. Steve Passik concerning abuse deterrent formulations and on November 16, 2016 with Dr. Ann Lembke regarding her work, “Drug Deal MD.” Tragically, the opioid epidemic continues unabated. In 2017 there were 72,000 drug overdose deaths, among these 29,000 were from synthetic opioids, predominately fentanyl.Listen to the interview here

The opioid crisis is the single greatest public health catastrophe in the last 100 years in the U.S., and the epidemic has reached epic proportions. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 72,000 Americans died from drug overdoses in 2017 — a twofold increase in drug-related deaths over the past decade, which included overdoses from both illicit and prescription narcotics.

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Moments with Marianne

Dave Chase is co-founder of Health Rosetta, which aims to accelerate the adoption of simple, practical, non-partisan fixes to our health care system.

Listen to the interview here

During the recent midterm elections, voters identified health care concern as their number one issue. Virtually everyone agrees the country needs health care reform, but not on how to accomplish that. Dave Chase is the co-founder of Health Rosetta, which has been described as “a non-profit which accelerates adoption of simple, practical, non-partisan fixes to our healthcare system.” Chase is also the author of the recent book, “The Opioid Crisis Wake-up Call.” Dave Chase joins Jerry Newcombe to discuss common sense and conservative approaches to health care reform in this country.

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October 2018

Opioids are killing many Americans today, and the problem appears to be getting worse. Dave Chase is the author of The Opioid Crisis Wake-up Call and the founder of Health Rosetta, a non-profit groups that strives for non-partisan fixes of our health care system. Referring to recent attempts in the Senate to fight the problem, Chase said recently, “We need to think bigger than this legislation if we want to get a real handle on the opioid crisis.

Listen to the Interview here

The broken U.S. healthcare system is stealing the American Dream from all of us. Millennial parents in particular will see half to two-thirds of their lifetime earnings going to healthcare if we don’t change the status quo. Already, 50% of millennials avoid seeing the doctor to cut costs.

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The opioid crisis is a national health emergency, but some states are hit harder than others.

California, Rhode Island, West Virginia, Kentucky and Florida suffer the most from opioid abuse, according to Fair Health, a New York-based nonprofit market research firm that analyzed 26 billion privately-billed medical and dental insurance claims from 2002 until 2017.

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The opioid crisis can be understood in a lot of different ways. It’s been described as a failure of policy, the collateral damage in the pursuit of irresponsible profits, or just the latest trend in an eons-old cycle of addiction. But one area that has not received enough scrutiny is the very nature of how healthcare is delivered and paid for in the United States.

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Opioids are still causing harm the people and we speak with Dave Chase, co-founder of Health Rosetta, to talk more about it and the harm it has caused.

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In response to pressure from the White House and the growing number of opioid-related deaths in the United States, the Senate recently passed sweeping legislation with the goal of combating the opioid crisis.Read the rest of the article here

Our guest on this episode is Dave Chase, the Co-Founder of the Health Rosetta. The Health Rosetta an open-source blueprint for the next generation’s health ecosystem that is focused on replacing our current system’s flawed practices and reversing the health care status quo.

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The most persistent myth in healthcare is that high cost equals high quality. It’s a proposition that holds across a great many products that are bought and sold in actual, functioning markets — but that’s not a description that applies to the U.S. healthcare industry

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The opioid crisis is not an anomaly. Instead, it’s a self-inflicted wound, driven by a catastrophically dysfunctional health care system, leading to what has become the largest public health crisis in 100 years. Fortunately, proven antidotes exist — all created and spearheaded by forward-looking citizen leaders and employers. It’s time to scale these solutions nationwide, stop the crisis in its tracks and move us light years closer to solving the larger disaster that is our health care system.

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Our guest on this episode is Dave Chase, the Co-Founder of the Health Rosetta. The Health Rosetta an open-source blueprint for the next generation’s health ecosystem that is focused on replacing our current system’s flawed practices and reversing the health care status quo.Watch the Interview Here

September 2018

The immense human toll of the opioid epidemic has policymakers at every level of government grasping for solutions. Unfortunately, the same sense of crisis that can help spur action has also led to poor policy proposals that threaten to do more harm than good.

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Dave Chase is – among other things – the author of a new book – The Opioid Crisis Wake-up Call. This book is available as a free download at healthrosetta.org. In it, he talks about how the healthcare system is contributing to the opioid crisis in this country and how some large companies are combatting this. It’s a different perspective on the whole addiction epidemic in this country.

Listen to the full interview here

3 Compelling Hours of Experts, and Authors Pursuing The Truth No Matter Where It Leads.

Senate Agrees on Opioid Crisis Response Act. Author of The Opioid Crisis Wake-up Call and co-founder of Health Rosetta, a non-profit which accelerates adoption of simple, practical, non-partisan fixes to our healthcare system talks

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The Senate passed a bipartisan legislation package that would take a multi-pronged approach to combating the opioid epidemic Monday.

The package will need to be reconciled with similar legislation passed by the House of Representatives in June, and legislation sponsor Tennessee Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander said he hopes the president will sign the measure into law in early October, reported NBC.

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Here comes a counterargument to two widely held opinions: that the U.S. healthcare system is broken, and that we are losing the battle against the opioid crisis.

Instead, Dave Chase says, healthcare is already fixed because solutions exist to the industry’s biggest dysfunctions – and he has specifics to prove it, such as places in the U.S. that are turning around the opioid problem around entirely.

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As the Senate takes up a large package of bills intended to help address the opioid crisis, attention has momentarily shifted away from the group that could do more than anyone else to end this scourge: employers who still pay to cover most of America’s working-age adults.Read the rest of the article here

Dave Chase, co-founder of the Health Rosetta and Author of The Opioid Crisis Wake-Up Call: Health Care Is Stealing the American Dream. Here’s How We Take It Back.

Listen to the full interview here

We all know that the opioid crisis we are currently facing is unlike anything we have seen before. Dave Chase, co-founder of Health Rosetta, authored a new book, The Opioid Crisis Wake-Up Call, about “upstream, systemic fixes designed to stop the crisis at its source.”

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Jimmy Sullivan prepared for his job as a bricklayer the same way every morning for years: injecting a shot of heroin before leaving his car.

The first time he overdosed on the job, in 2013 at a Virginia construction site, a co-worker who is his cousin stealthily injected a dose of Narcan, an opioid antidote, into Mr. Sullivan’s leg. He woke up and went straight back to work.

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Despite growing awareness of the dangers around opioid overuse, 30% of all people in large employer plans still receive an opioid prescription every year. That is a rate that far exceeds what evidence-based medicine would suggest is appropriate.

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Hospital systems are making secret contracts with insurers that are keeping health care costs high, a Wall Street Journal report revealed, prompting alternative health care advocates to point out the flawed nature of the U.S. health care system.

Read the rest of the article here The Daily Caller

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People’s Pundit Daily Editor Richard Baris joins me to talk about the latest on the Judge Kavanaugh nomination process, and the latest Big Data Poll numbers. Creator of “Health Rosetta,” and author Dave Chase on the latest Opioid crisis legislation, and the current state of our healthcare system. We also look back on the recent Dr. Alveda King interview. Of course we’ll also have our weekly “Vets in the Fight” SITREP and all the latest conservative news.

Listen to the full interview here

A combination of overstretched primary care and perverse incentives within the health care industry made the U.S. opioid epidemic a “self-inflicted wound,” the author of new book “The Opioid Crisis Wake-up Call: Health Care Is Stealing the American Dream. Here’s How We Take It Back” told The Daily Caller News Foundation.Read the rest of the article here

Now more than ever, the media landscape is turning an increasingly critical eye towards pharmacy benefit managers — the health care system’s favorite scapegoats. As health care costs continue to rise at staggering rates, these organizations can help their clients save on drug costs. However, it’s a complicated and confusing minefield in which they operate. Phrases like “rebate negotiation” and countless fees and hidden costs contribute to making this industry uncomfortably opaque. It can also be a struggle to avoid financial conflicts of interest.

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This week’s guest, for Bold Moves Podcast Episode 201 Dave Chase has some bold moves! The opioid crisis is the single greatest public health catastrophe in the last 100 years. People are dying every day – and it’s heartbreaking to see the lengths our kids will go to get these addictive drugs. Evidence shows that after seven days of opioid use, one in six will become addicted.Listen to the full interview here

August 2018

In an evolving labor market where employees are expecting (and receiving) higher pay and better perks, employers often compete in the race for top talent by offering better and bolder benefits packages. And with the unemployment rate as low as 4% as of this June, that race is clearly heating up.

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July 2018

Just as in retirement plans, in the health benefits market there can be conflicts-of-interests between providers that drive up costs for employers and employees and result in decisions being made that are not in the best interest of participants.

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Dave Chase is a man on a mission. Like many of us, he believes our current healthcare system is broken, and he has a plan to fix it. He co-founded Health Rosetta to help accomplish that.

Read the rest of the interview here

Health care is notoriously complicated. But it’s also a mega-market rife with waste and inefficiencies. That makes it hard for big tech companies to ignore.

In the past five years, Apple, Amazon, Alphabet, Microsoft and Salesforce have all made big moves into the sector, as evidenced by a string of recent hires, product announcements and acquisitions.

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Want to change health care? Start with employers.

Seattle-based investor Dave Chase has studied health care market forces for more than a decade, and he has a background in enterprise sales. He’s not surprised that the Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and J.P. Morgan health consortium is starting with its own 1.2 million employees first.

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It’s clear that the health benefits industry is undergoing an evolution, which benefits advisers are fast turning into a revolution. For the past several years, insurance carriers have steadily increased rates, offering all kinds of incentives to advisers to keep as many employers on their plan as possible. Now, advisers are pushing back.

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Company leaders don’t have a lot of allies in their constant battle against skyrocketing healthcare costs for their employees: And, if you’re that leader, even the one person you see as your closest advisor might not even be on your side.

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Frank MicDroppa song parodies Frank Sinatra’s One Note Samba! At his first ever “NOT FAKE NEWS” Insurance Benefits press conference! Bad Lip Reading plus music babe!

Watch the video here

June 2018

In Episode 47, Dr Roussel interviews Mr Dave Chase, author of “CEO’s Guide to Restoring the American Dream,” founder of the HealthRosetta movement, a regular author for Forbes and successful serial healthcare start-up entrepreneur. In the interview they discuss why healthcare for companies has become unsustainably expensive and how this situation can be changed to provide value for money spent on healthcare.

Listen to the Podcast Here

Far from being wonder drugs, opioids are powerful narcotics that provide a short-term fix for treating symptoms, without addressing most underlying causes. If we’re not careful, the steps we take to treat the opioid epidemic could go the same route, with the same sad results.

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February 2018

Dr. Craig Wax speaks with David Chase, Institute CEO & Group Co-founder of Health Rosetta about the cost of U.S. Healthcare.

Listen to the Interview Here